Recent Workshops Offered by RESTORE

2006
Green Building Ventilation Systems – New York, NY

2002
Mortars -- U. Penn
Cleaning Masonry -- Seattle, WA

2001
Mortars, Stanford U.
Composite Repair -- Seattle, WA

2000
Cleaning Masonry, Stanford U.
Terra Cotta, Seattle, WA
Sustainable Architecture, Cairo, Egypt

1999
Terra Cotta, Stanford U.
Terra Cotta -- Chicago, IL

1998
Composite Repair -- Stanford U.

1997
Health Hazards --New Orleans, LA


RESTORE Workshop on The Design of Green Building Ventilation Systems : Preventing Sick Building Syndrome & Control of Toxic Materials, Thursday, June 22, 2006, The Urban Center, New York, NY

Architectural design and construction work are increasingly affected by governmental health regulations. Failure to comply with regulations not only threatens the health and safety of employees and contaminates the environment, but can endanger a company’s financial well-being with costly accidents, fines, and lawsuits.

Proper ventilation is one of the issues most critical to workplace safety. This one-day workshop offered an excellent opportunity for design professionals to aware of the hazards posed by toxic airborne gases and vapors, how to comply with current regulations and the guidelines for designing proper ventilation systems to help control exposure to toxic materials. Participants in this workshop learned how to address indoor air quality issues through proper ventilation, and they earned valuable continuing education credits required by New York State. This topic continues to be of great importance to anyone involved in the design of green building ventilation systems - either specifying new HVAC systems or retrofitting older buildings with modern, code-compliant ventilation equipment. The workshop specifically addressed these issues:

  • How to identify, in the planning stage, systems that do not meet the standards.
  • How to recognize, by sight, finished systems that are wrong for the proposed application.
  • EPA exhaust and emission standards, types of air purifiers, sick building syndrome, mold and other biological hazards.
  • How to identify true "Green Materials" by understanding the definitions of technical terms used on material safety data sheets (MSDS).
  • How to evaluate air quality test data and measure air flow.
  • How to analyze advertising claims for bogus air purification systems.
  • The basic provisions of the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Hazard Communication Standard and the New York State Right-to-Know Law.
  • Protecting yourself on site: safety equipment and respiratory protection.
  • The chemical and physical hazards of materials used in construction and building preservation.

In addition to principles of ventilation, this RESTORE Workshop will also addressed right-to-know training and met the training requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(h) with the exception of site specific hazards on individual jobs

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RESTORE Workshop on Mortars for Historic Structures: Characterization, Performance, and Formulation
University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia September 26 – 28, 2002

In September 2002, RESTORE presented a three-day Workshop on Mortars for Historic Structures: Characterization, Performance, Replication, the first in this series to be held at University of Pennsylvania. The workshop covered all aspects of this fundamental preservation maintenance procedure.

Replacing deteriorated mortar is one of the most important periodic needs of masonry structures. Proper analysis and formulation of mortars is critical to an architectural conservation project. A pointing mortar must be chemically and physically compatible with the surrounding masonry materials and must be installed correctly. If not, the mortar will perform poorly and fail, adversely affecting the weathering resistance of a structure, and accelerating deterioration processes. When properly formulated and installed, pointing mortars will last for generations, making masonry one of the most durable construction materials.

Through lecture, laboratory and field-workshop sessions this RESTORE workshop demonstrated to participants how to analyze, formulate and install pointing mortars that are physically and chemically compatible with the original materials. The workshop included a working laboratory session at the renowned Architectural Conservation Laboratory of the School of Architecture at U Penn and an on-site case study of conditions and a hands-on demonstration of repointing techniques and materials at the historic Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site. AIA members qualified for 21 Continuing Education Learning Units, including three Health, Safety, Welfare. The Workshop equipped participants to address the following issues:

  • Decision-making strategies for the preservation and repointing of masonry; diagnosis of deterioration processes
  • Historical development of mortars
  • Methods for analyzing the properties of mortar and formulating mortars that are desirable for long-term performance
  • Materials analysis - binders and aggregates: typologies and properties
  • Health and environmental issues related to mortar removal and repointing materials
  • Design issues related to repointing and visual compatibility of repointing mortars


    The response to this workshop from both the sponsors and the students was terrific. The written evaluations from the workshop participants – the barometer of our success – were extremely positive. Geographically, the workshop drew participants from around the nation. The fifty participants came from New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and the greater Philadelphia area , California, Washington State, Minnesota, Ohio, Louisiana and Puerto Rico. The participants profile included a cross-section of U Penn students, architects, architectural conservators, engineers, preservationists, contractors and craftworkers.

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RESTORE Workshop on Cleaning Masonry Structures
Seattle, Washington, May 2 – 3, 2002

In May of 2002, RESTORE presented a Workshop on the Technology of Cleaning Masonry Structures, the third in a series of RESTORE Workshops on Architectural Conservation Techniques held in Seattle. The workshop covered all aspects of this challenging and complex process and gave participants an understanding of the methodology and technology of cleaning masonry structures.

The 55 workshop participants included a cross-section of architects, architectural conservators, engineers, preservationists, contractors and craftworkers. Geographically the workshop drew participants from around the nation and abroad, including New York, California, Texas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Washington, Puerto Rico, Canada and the Dominican Republic. AIA members received fifteen hours of Continuing Education Learning Units, including three hours of Health, Safety, Welfare. The Workshop equipped participants to address the following issues:

  • A materials science understanding of the chemical and physical properties of masonry materials i.e. stone and architectural ceramics - brick and terra cotta
  • Identification and characterization of masonry materials and of soiling conditions present on the building
  • Materials and methods of cleaning masonry structures
  • Selecting the proper cleaning techniques and materials
  • Understanding health and environmental hazards inherent in cleaning materials and processes

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RESTORE Workshop on Mortar Matching and Repointing:

Materials and Techniques
Stanford University, September 27 – 28, 2001

In the fall of 2001, RESTORE presented the Workshop on Mortar Matching and Repointing, the fourth in a series of workshops held at Stanford University. Repointing is of vital importance in the conservation of masonry structures. A mortar mixture must be similar to the existing mortar or stone in both its chemical and physical properties. Otherwise, the new mortar will adversely affect the aesthetic quality and weathering resistance of the structure. When properly installed, masonry repointing will last for generations, making masonry one of the most durable construction materials. When improperly installed, the mortar will perform poorly, look aesthetically unappealing, and, in some cases even accelerate structural damage.

The RESTORE workshop demonstrated to participants how to formulate mortar mixes that are physically and chemically compatible with the original materials. AIA members received fifteen hours of Continuing Education Learning Units, including three hours of Health, Safety, Welfare. The workshop addressed such issues as:

  • Decision making strategies for the repair of masonry structures
  • Diagnosis of the deterioration process
  • Methods for analyzing properties of mortar compounds desirable for long term performance
  • Analysis, mortar removal, surface preparation
  • Health and environmental issues related to mortar removal methods and repointing
  • Installation and finishing mortar joint profiles
  • Design issues related to repointing; visual compatibility of repair to existing elements

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RESTORE Workshop on Formulating Composite Repair Materials for Masonry
Seattle Washington, May 2 – 3, 2001

In the spring of 2001, RESTORE presented the Workshop on Formulating Composite Repair Materials for Masonry as part of the highly successful RESTORE Workshop Series on Architectural Conservation Techniques. This was the second workshop of the series to be held in Seattle. The Workshop attracted architects, engineers, craftworkers, preservation / conservation consultants, cultural resource managers and an archeologist from a number of states including, Texas, Montana, Louisiana, Arizona, Minnesota, Ohio, California, Oregon, British Columbia and of course the State of Washington.

The participants learned how to formulate composite repair materials that, when properly installed, will enhance the durability and appearance of a masonry structure of any vintage. AIA members received fifteen hours of Continuing Education Learning Units, including three hours of Health, Safety, Welfare (HSW). Topics covered in the workshop included:

  • The health and environmental issues related to composite repair materials and processes
  • Methods for analyzing the properties of composite repair compounds that are desirable for long term performance
  • Installation and finishing of composite repairs; surface preparation, anchoring and reinforcement
  • Techniques for the repair and stabilization of masonry structures: adhesive repairs and injection grouting
  • Design issues related to composite repair formulations; visual compatibility of the repair to existing elements

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RESTORE Workshop on Cleaning Masonry Structures
Stanford University School of Earth Sciences, October 5 – 6, 2000

RESTORE presented the Workshop on Cleaning Masonry Structures, the third in a series of workshops held at Stanford University. The workshop was highly successful, with fifty participants representing a cross-section of architects, engineers, craftworkers, contractors, facilities managers and preservationists from all parts of the nation. The workshop covered all aspects of this challenging and complex process and gave participants an understanding of the methodology and technology of cleaning masonry structures.

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RESTORE Workshop on The Conservation of Architectural Terra Cotta
Seattle Washington, May 4 – 5, 2000

The Workshop on The Conservation of Architectural Terra Cotta was the first in a series of Workshops to be held in Seattle. RESTORE presented this highly successful workshop in the spring of 2000. The conservation of architectural terra cotta presents many difficult issues, which require a through understanding of construction technology and the chemical and physical properties of terra cotta to ensure its proper conservation. The forty-six participants included: architects, engineers, craftworkers, contractors, building owners and architectural conservators. AIA members received fifteen hours worth of Learning Units, including three hours of Health, Safety, Welfare. Specifically, this RESTORE workshop examined:

  • Physical and chemical properties of architectural terra cotta
  • Manufacture and construction technology of architectural terra cotta
  • Decay processes - weathering and soiling; spalling, cracked glazing, deteriorated anchoring systems
  • Inspection, analysis and cleaning of terra cotta facades; decision-making strategies for repair and/or replacement
  • Problems specific to the use of architectural terra cotta in high-rise structures
  • Health and environmental hazards inherent in materials and processes used in terra cotta restoration

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Task Force on Sustainable Architecture
Hassan Fathy Institute , March 2000, Cairo, Egypt

In March of 2000, Jan C. K. Anderson of RESTORE was invited to be a member of the Task Force to draft the Charter of Cairo and to participate in the Hassan Fathy Institute’s Conference on Sustainable Architecture. The conference focused on the severe lack of decent, affordable housing worldwide and was attended by design professionals, planners, public policy decision makers and trade union officials from around the world. The housing problem is particularly acute in developing nations where housing needs cannot always be met through use of modern construction materials and techniques, which are scarce, expensive and wasteful.

The conference explored ways to promote the increased use of indigenous building materials such as mud brick, bamboo, wood and thatching. These materials have been used for centuries and are durable, attractive, inexpensive and environmentally friendly. A fundamental and integral element of sustainable architecture is the training of skilled craftworkers to design, build and maintain the housing in their local communities. To articulate this thesis, the conference participants will work to draft and adopt The Charter of Cairo, a manifesto that will serve as an international guideline for the development of sustainable communities worldwide.

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RESTORE Workshop on The Conservation of Architectural Terra Cotta,
Stanford University School of Earth Sciences, September 16 - 18, 1999

The second in the RESTORE Workshop Series at Stanford University focused on the conservation of architectural terra cotta. This workshop was held at the School of Earth Sciences and included a day-long field trip to the Gladding McBean terra cotta manufacturing facility. There were forty-five participants, representing the diversity of the field of building preservation. Approximately half of the attendees were preservation craftworkers, with architects, engineers, consultants, facilities managers and contractors making up the balance.

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RESTORE Workshop on The Conservation of Architectural Terra Cotta

Chicago, Illinois, May 4 -- 5, 1999

RESTORE introduced a Series of Workshops on Architectural Conservation Techniques in Chicago. The first Workshop of the Series addressed the preservation and maintenance of architectural terra cotta. The Workshop was a great success, with over seventy participants representing a cross-section of architects, engineers, craftworkers, contractors, facilities managers and preservationists. Geographically the Workshop drew participants from around the nation, from New York City to Seattle and San Francisco, with many from the Midwest. Everyone displayed a great deal of interest and enthusiasm for the issues that were covered, and many of the participants indicated that they wish to take part in the future workshops in this Workshop Series. The Workshop helped to instill a spirit of collaboration among the diverse segments of the preservation community that attended.

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RESTORE Workshop on Formulating Composite Repair Materials for Masonry
Stanford University School of Earth Sciences, September 17 – 18, 1998

This was the first in the RESTORE Workshop Series on Architectural Conservation Techniques presented at the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University. Participants learned how to design mortar mixes and formulate composite repair compounds for stone that are physically and chemically compatible with the original materials. There were forty participants, representing the diversity of the field of building preservation. Approximately half of the attendees were preservation craftworkers, with architects, engineers, consultants, facilities managers and contractors making up the balance.

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RESTORE Workshop on Understanding the Hazards Inherent in

Conservation Materials and Processes
New Orleans, Louisiana, May 22-23, 1997

Understanding the health risks posed by many restoration materials and process is essential to the safe and effective treatment of architectural conservation problems. This workshop focused on key preservation processes and materials and on their inherent hazards. The workshop presented practical solutions to critical preservation problems related to the hazards and environmental impact of the technology we specify and use today. This RESTORE Workshop was funded in part by the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training of the National Park Service, The International Masonry Institute, and the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers. Graduates of this RESTORE Workshop are eligible to receive 48 AIA Continuing Education Learning Units.

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